Informations NBS

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"Climate change and forest ecosystems are closely connected, with climate mainly affecting the rate, frequency, intensity and timing of air temperature, solar radiation and rainfall. Climate change impacts can be both positive and negative on forest structure, growth patterns, composition, productivity and functioning, depending on the location and type of forest. For example, positive effects are expected, in Europe, on wood production and wood supply, especially at high latitude, due to enhanced CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and more rainfall. However, climate change could represent a threat for forest ecosystems and services,...
This publication intends to inspire policy and decision makers by showcasing a selection of solutions, that have been applied in very different settings. It shows that ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) has ‘many faces’: It is being implemented successfully in a broad range of countries and ecosystems and it is being driven forward by all kinds of people and organizations. EbA solutions are applied examples of successful processes or approaches to solve a specifi c challenge related to climate change. They address current and future climate change impacts (e.g. floods, droughts, storms, sea level rise, melting of glaciers) on human wellbeing...
This handbook provides practical guidance for planning and implementing community-led ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) in three vulnerable ecosystems: mountains, drylands and coastal areas. It is intended for project managers, practitioners and technical specialists. The guidance is structured around eight key steps in the project cycle, and includes general implementation protocols for EbA in each target ecosystem. It also includes an introduction to EbA which is intended for a broader audience, including policymakers.
This brief makes the case for ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) by presenting how it can generate multiple environmental, social and economic benefits. Research shows that benefiting from a wide range of ecosystem services is closely correlated with communities’ degree of resilience to challenges. It presents case studies from Peru, Nepal and Uganda. This guidance document is part of a series of learning briefs, which draw experiences and lessons learned from working on ecosystem-based adaptation within the global EbA in Mountain Ecosystems Programme from 2011 to 2015. The briefs are designed for practitioners, including local government...
This brief provides an introduction to ecosystem-based adaptation to climatic risks and hazards. It presents the concept and principles of ecosystem-based adaptation, the environmental, social and cultural benefits, as well as case studies from Nepal, Peru and Uganda. Further, it proposes a framework for holistic ecosystem-based adaptation. This guidance document is part of a series of learning briefs, which draw experiences and lessons learned from working on ecosystem-based adaptation within the global ecosystem-based adaptation in Mountain Ecosystems Programme from 2011 to 2015.
This report presents seven case studies compiled by researchers and practitioners. These case studies from different countries cover a range of topics in the Ecosystem-based Disaster Risk Reduction (Eco-DRR) context, and are as follows: Landslide hazard regulation and mitigation: Creating Resilient Landscapes in the Serrana region of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil
Integrated Coastal Zone Management in Semarang (ICZM), Central Java, Indonesia
Room for the River - Flood Risk Management, The Netherlands
Integrated Water Resources Management – Tacaná Watersheds, Guatemala/Mexico
Linkages between Disaster Risk Reduction and...
Japan is an archipelago of several thousand islands stretching some 3,000 kilometers from north to south, sitting on the boundaries of multiple tectonic plates. Large differences in elevation between the coastal and mountainous areas create steep terrain and many rapid rivers. Japan is located in one of the world's most seismically active areas and accounts for about 20 percent of the world's large earthquakes as well as about 10 percent of all active volcanoes in the world. Japan has four distinct seasons influenced by monsoon and heavy precipitation especially during the rainy and typhoon seasons. Because of these geographic and climatic...
Extreme weather events, driven largely by rising global temperatures, are increasing in both their frequency and impact. In the coming years, climate change is expected to further increase the severity and frequency of weather-related natural hazards such as storms, intense rainfall, f loods, droughts and heat-waves. From 1997 to 2006, more than 2.6 billion people were affected by hazards mostly related to weather extremes, causing over 1.2 million deaths and damage costing some US$800 billion. Future predictions are that this situation is likely to worsen. While most of society is likely to be affected to some degree by the predicted...
Vulnerability to natural disasters continues to increase, severely compromising the achievement of poverty alleviation goals in many developing countries. A more effec-tive approach is needed to reduce the impacts of these disasters. This publication proposes an approach that integrates ecosystem manage-ment, development planning and risk reduction strategies to reduce disaster impacts and improve both livelihoods and biodiversity outcomes. Ecosystem management can contribute to more effective reduction of disaster risk in two major ways. Well-managed ecosystems can mitigate the impact of most natural hazards, such as landslides, hurricanes...
This report tries to demonstrate the role of Green Infrastructure (GI) for mitigating vulnerability to weather and climate variability-related natural hazards at European level, addressing some of the challenges and information gaps. It proposes a simple, practical methodology for screening (rather than assessing) ecosystem services in areas where GI may contribute to reducing current (or future) weather and climate-related natural hazards. The report addresses landslides, avalanches, floods, soil erosion, storm surges and carbon stabilisation by ecosystems.

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